NEW ENTRIES

YOSHIDA KENKO: ESSAYS IN IDLENESS

We swarm like ants, scurrying to east and west, dashing to north and south, folk of high birth and of low, old and young, some going, others returning, sleeping at night, rising again next morning … What is all this busyness? There is no end to our greed for life, our lust for gain.

We tend our bodies – to what end? Old age and death are the only sure things awaiting us. Swiftly they come, without an instant’s pause. What pleasure is to be found while we await them? The deluded have no fear of this truth. In thrall to the lure of fame and fortune, they never pause to see what lies so close before them. Fools mourn it. In their longing for eternal life, they have no understanding of the law of mutability.

(74)

What kind of man will feel depressed at being idle? There is nothing finer than to be alone with nothing to distract you.

If you follow the ways of the world, your heart will be drawn to its sensual defilements and easily led astray; if you go among people, your words will be guided by others’ responses rather than come from the heart. There is nothing firm or stable in a life spent between larking about together and quarrelling, exuberant one moment, aggrieved and resentful the next. You are forever pondering pros and cons, endlessly absorbed in questions of gain and loss. And on top of delusion comes drunkenness, and in that drunkenness you dream.

Scurrying and bustling, heedless and forgetful — such are all men. Even if you do not yet understand the True Way, you can achieve what could be termed temporary happiness at least by removing yourself from outside influences, taking no part in the affairs of the world, calming yourself and stilling the mind. As The Great Cessation and Insight says, we must ‘break all ties with everyday life, human affairs, the arts and scholarship’.

(75)

No one begrudges the passing moment. Is this because they are wise, or because they are fools? To the lazy fools among them I would say: a single coin may be next to worthless, but it is through their accumulation that the poor man becomes rich. This is why the merchant is so keen to save every coin he can. You may not be aware of the moments, but as long as they continue to pass, you will very soon find yourself at the end of life. Thus, one dedicated to the Way must not concern himself over the distant future. His only care should be not to let the present moment slip vainly through his fingers.

Imagine someone comes to you and announces that you will die tomorrow. How will you spend your last day? What entertainment could you find? How would you busy yourself? And how is this day we are now living different from that final day?

We inevitably waste most of each day in eating and drinking, defecating, sleeping, talking and walking about. For the tiny remainder of our time, we do worthless things, speak worthless words, think worthless thoughts. And not only do we pass the moments in this way, but whole days, whole months pass thus — a lifetime. This is supreme folly.

Xie Lingyun was recorder of the translation of The Lotus Sutra, but he was taken up with thoughts of his own advancement, so Hui Yuan refused to include him in his pious Bailian group.

Lose for a moment your grasp of the passing instant and you are as good as dead. You ask why time should be so precious? It is so that you may concentrate the mind on banishing all idle thoughts, refrain from engaging in worldly matters and meditate if this is what you choose, or perform austerities if that is your chosen path.

(108)

‘Where you live has no bearing on your dedication to the Way,’ some claim. ‘What’s so difficult about praying for rebirth in paradise while you live in a household and have daily dealings with others?’

Only someone with no understanding of salvation in the next world would say this. If you really do hold this world to be a brief and fleeting place, and dedicate yourself to transcending its suffering, what pleasure could you find in serving your master day in day out, or busying yourself with the concerns of your family? The human heart is easily influenced; without quiet and tranquility it is hard to pursue a practice of the Way.

These days, people are not made of the stuff of the old ascetics. If they retreat to the wilds of mountain and forest, they nevertheless eat enough to save themselves from starvation, and they cannot get by without some protection from the storms. It is only natural, then, that they should sometimes tend towards worldly desire. But this is absolutely no reason to conclude, ‘There’s no point in retreating from the world. Just look what happened. Why did
he bother even trying?’ After all, even if someone who has turned his back on the world and embarked on a practice does still harbour desires, they cannot compare with the lusts of those in powerful places. How much does it cost others to provide him with paper bedding, a hemp robe, a bowl and a meal of rough gruel? Surely his needs are simple, and his heart easily satisfied? For all his occasional urges, shame at his appearance will keep him away from evil temptation and turn him constantly towards good.

The testament to our birth in the human realm should be a strong urge to escape from this world. Surely there can be nothing to distinguish us from the beasts, if we simply devote ourselves to greed and never turn our hearts to the Buddhist Truth.

(58)

Those who feel the impulse to pursue the path of enlightenment should immediately take the step, and not defer it while they attend to all the other things on their mind. If you say to yourself, ‘Let’s just wait until after this is over,’ or ‘While I’m at it I’ll just see to that,’ or ‘People will criticize me about such-and-such so I should make sure it’s all dealt with and causes no problem later,’ or ‘There’s been time enough so far, after all, and it won’t take long just to a wait a little longer while I do this. Let’s not rush into things,’ one imperative thing after another will occur to detain you. There will be no end to it all, and the day of decision will never come.

In general, I find that reasonably sensitive and intelligent people will pass their whole life without taking the step they know they should. Would anyone with a fire close behind him choose to pause before fleeing? In a matter of life and death, one casts aside shame, abandons riches and runs. Does mortality wait on our choosing? Death comes upon us more swiftly than fire or flood. There is no escaping it. Who at that moment can refuse to part with all they love — aged parents, beloved children, lord and master, or the love of others?

(59)

One morning after a beautiful fall of snow, I had reason to write a letter to an acquaintance, but I omitted to make any mention of the snow. I was delighted when she responded, ‘Do you expect me to pay any attention to the words of someone so perverse that he fails to enquire how I find this snowy landscape? What deplorable insensitivity!’

The lady is no longer alive, so I treasure even this trifling memory.

(31)

Someone told me the following incident.

‘It had been quite some time since I’d called on a certain lady. Aware of my negligence, I was imagining how resentful she would be feeling, and wondering what I could possibly say, when a message came from her asking if I had a servant to spare, and if so might she borrow him. This was quite unexpected and delightful. Such tact and sensibility is a fine thing.’ I could quite see why he said so.

(36)

When Enseimon-in was a little girl, she asked someone who was visiting her father, the retired emperor, to deliver this poem to him:

With the letter that reads ‘two’ (futatsu moji – こ)
and with an ox’s horns (ushi no tsuno moji – い)
with the straight one (sugu na moji – し)
and with the crooked one (yugami moji to zo – く)
so do I yearn for you. (kimi wa oboyuru)

The meaning is that she yearned for him ‘lovingly’.

(62)

If someone with whom one constantly shares one’s intimate everyday life suddenly becomes reserved and polite in a certain situation, some will no doubt react by saying, ‘Why so formal all of a sudden?’ It strikes me, however, as a sign of true integrity and excellence of character.

On the other hand, if someone you don’t know well opened up and started talking candidly to you, you would also be favourably impressed.

(37)

Going on a journey, whatever the destination, makes you feel suddenly awake and alive to everything.

There are so many new things to see in rustic places and country villages as you wander about looking. It is also delightful to send word to those back home in the capital asking for news, and adding reminders to be sure and see to this or that matter.

In such places, you are particularly inclined to be attentive to all you see. You even notice the fine quality of things you’ve brought with you, and someone’s artistic talents or beauty will delight you more than they usually would.

Withdrawing quietly to a retreat at a temple or shrine is also delightful.

(15)

When you are on a retreat at a mountain temple, concentrating on your devotions, the hours are never tedious, and the heart feels cleansed and purified.

(17)

Someone told the following tale. A man sells an ox. The buyer says he will come in the morning to pay and take the beast. But during the night, the ox dies. ‘The buyer thus gained, while the seller lost,’ he concluded.

But a bystander remarked, ‘The owner did indeed lose on the transaction, but he profited greatly in another way. Let me tell you why. Living creatures have no knowledge of the nearness of death. Such was the ox, and such too are we humans. As it happened, the ox died that night; as it happened, the owner lived on. One day’s life is more precious than a fortune’s worth of money, while an ox’s worth weighs no more than a goose feather. One cannot say that a man who gains a fortune while losing a coin or two has made a loss.’

Everyone laughed at this. ‘That reasoning doesn’t only apply to the owner of the ox,’ they scoffed. The man went on. ‘Well then, if people hate death they should love life. Should we not relish each day the joy of survival? Fools forget this — they go striving after other enjoyments, cease to appreciate the fortune they have and risk all to lay their hands on fresh wealth. Their desires are never sated. There is a deep contradiction in failing to enjoy life and yet fearing death when faced with it. It is because they have no fear of death that people fail to enjoy life — no, not that they don’t fear it, but rather they forget its nearness. Of course, it must be said that the ultimate gain lies in transcending the relative world with its distinction between life and death.’

At this, everyone jeered more than ever.

(93)

No one, hearing that someone is setting out the next day on a long journey, will confront them with something to attend to that requires their calm and undivided attention. A man in the midst of a sudden major upheaval or terrible sorrow is in no position to listen to talk about other matters, or to enquire about the griefs and joys of others. No one would think to complain of his remissness. And the same applies, surely, to those of advancing years or visited by illness, not to mention those who have chosen to leave the world for a life of religious devotion.

None of the requirements of human interaction and etiquette can be easily avoided. If we insist on being punctilious in all those worldly demands so difficult to ignore, it will only add to desires, shackle our lives and leave no space in our hearts for calm detachment, and we will end up wasting our entire life being driven to distraction by trivial matters.

‘Night closes in, the way is long. / My feet have stumbled on life’s road.’ Now is the time to cast off all worldly ties. Turn your back on loyalty. Think no more of propriety. Those who fail to understand are free to call you mad, deranged, lacking all feeling. No censure can hurt you now, nor praise sway you.

(112)

兼好法師 『徒然草』

人が蟻のように集まってきて、東に西に急ぎ、南に北に走ってゆく。身分の高い者がいれば、卑い者もいる。老者がいれば、若者もいる。これらの人はみな、用があって行く所があり、帰ってくる家がある。夜になれば寝、朝が来れば起きる。彼らのこのような生の営みは、いったい何のためなのか? 要するに、少しでも長く生きたい、もっと金を儲けたいの一心でかくあくせくと生き働いているだけではないか。

だが、そういうふうにわが身大事に生きて、将来に何を求め、期待するというのか? 待ちうけるものは、ただ、老いと死しかない。しかも老いと死の来ることは速やかであって、一刻もとどまることがない。休みなくたしかな足取りで一歩一歩近づいてくるそれを待つあいだ、生きていてなんの楽しみがあろう、楽しみなどあるはずがない。ただこの世のことに夢中になっている者のみは、この老いと死を恐れない。彼らは名誉と利益に溺れて、老いと死の近いことを顧みもしないからだ。一方、愚かな者は、ひたすらただその来ることの速やかなのを思って悲しんでばかりいる。生きていたいとばかり願って、この世に常住なるものはなく、万物は変化流転するという大理法を知らないからだ。

(74)

何もせずひとりきりでいるのを、侘しくてならぬといって嘆くひとが多いが、あれはどういう了見だろう。世事に東奔西走する必要もなく、外のことに気を紛らわされることもなく、身を閑の中に置いて、我ひとり醒めているくらいいいことは、他にはないではないか。

考えてもみるがいいのだ。世間の仕組みに従って生きようとすれば、外のつまらぬ事柄に心をとられて、我が我でなく、いろんな悩みが起きやすい。世間並みにすれば人と付合わずにすまされないが、人と付合えば、もしや人の気に逆らいやせぬかと心配になって言いたいことがあっても言えぬ。人の御機嫌とりには言いたくないことも国にせねばならぬ。これでは何を言っても、言うことがまるで自分の心のようではない。また、世間に生きれば、人とふざけたりもする。人と争いもする。あるときはしてくれなかったと恨み、あるときはしてくれたといって喜ぶ。そんなふうに心が絶えず外のことに動かされて、一時として安定している折がない。弁別心がむやみとさかんになって、絶えずこれは得か損かと利害損失ばかり考えている。

その状態はまさに「惑い」にほかならず、惑いながら酔っぱらって、酔った中でゆめをみているようなものだ。自分でも何をしているのかわからないのである。なぜそうしているかもわからぬまま、年がら年中忙しく走りまわり、ぼうとしたまま生死の一大事を忘れて生きているのだ。世間を見わたせば、世の人の生き方とはみんあそんなふうではないか。世間並みに生きればそうなるしかないのである。

しかし、そうでない生き方もある。まだ本当の道がわかるところまで行っていなくとも、世間との縁を切って身を閑の状態に置き、俗事にはいっさいかかわらず、心を安らかに自由にしておくのこそ、この短い人生をしばらくでも楽しむ生き方と言うべきだろう。

「生活・人事・技能・学問等の諸縁を止めよ」と、『摩訶止観』にもある。

(75)

世の中を見るに、寸陰というようなわずかな時間だとこれを惜しむ人がいない。これは、惜しむに足らぬという理を知ってそうしているのか、愚かで寸陰の尊さを知らずにそうしているのか。

(理を知ってそうしている人には何も言うことはないが)愚かさで時をぞんざいに扱っている人のために言うなら、一銭はそれ自体はごく軽少なものだが、これを積み重ねれば、貧しい人をも富んだ人にする。だから商人が一銭を惜しむ気持ちはあのように切実なのだ。一刹那というのは過ぎるのが意識もできぬくらいの瞬時だが、命を終える時がたちまちにやってくる。

だから、仏道修行を志した人は、漠然とはるかな月日を惜しむようではいけないのだ。今この一瞬のときが、空しく過ぎてゆくのをこそ惜しまねばならない。もし人が来て、「お前の命は、明日は必ずなくなるぞ」と告げ知らせたとしたら、今日一日を過ごすあいだ、何を頼みとし、何をしたらいいか。

(だが、これを仮のことと思ってはいけない)我々が生きている今この時こそ、まさに、その明日がないと告知された時にほかならないのだ。

一日のうちに、食事をしたり、便所に行ったり、睡眠をとったり、会話したり、歩いたり、どうしても必ずせねばならぬことがあり、それをするだけで既に多くの時を失う。その余りの時はいくらもないのに、それを、無益なことをしたり、無益なことを考えたりして時を過ごすばかりか、それが積み重なって一日が消え、月となり、一生を送るのである。なんと愚かなことではないか。

謝霊運は法華経の翻訳を筆録したほどの人だったが、心の中でつねに政治的野心を思い描いていたから、恵遠は彼が白蓮社の仲間に入ることを許さなかった。寸陰というわずかの時をも惜しむ心がない時は、その人は死んでいるも同然である。時間を何のために惜しむかと言えば、心の内にはつまらぬ思慮分別を起こすことなく、閑を得て満足する人はそれを楽しみ、さらに修行しようと志す人は修行するがいいということだ。

(108)

「求道心がありさえすれば、住む所はどこでもいいのではないか。わが家にいて俗人と付き合っていても、後の世の救いを願うことができないわけではあるまい」などと言うのは、後世ね外の何たるかがまるでわかっていない人だ。

本気で、真剣に、この世のはかなさを知り、必ずや生死の迷いを脱却して、菩提に達しようと思ったならば、何が面白くて朝夕主君に仕えたり、一家を営むのにあくせくしたりする気になれようず。人間のこころというものは、環境との関係ですぐに変わるものだから、身を閑の状態に置くのでなければ、本当の仏道修行は為しがたいのである。

仏道修行者としての器量のことを言うなら、今の人はとうてい昔の修行者に及ばない。だから世を捨てて山林に入っても、腹が飢えぬようにするとか、雨風の入りこまぬ用意をするとか、そういう生活手段への配慮をせずにはやっていけない。となれば、どうしても必然的に、俗人が物欲を逞しくするのに似た仕業を、当人にその気はなくとも、してしまうことがないわけにはゆくまい。が、だからといって、「それじゃ世を捨てた甲斐もないではないか。そんなことをするなら、なぜ世を捨てたのだ」などと非難するのは、当たらないのである。

そこは何と言っても、ひとたび世を捨てて仏道に入った人は、俗人とはちがうのだ。たとえ衣食住への配慮をすると言っても、現世の勢力家たちの物欲の旺んなのとはまるっきり違う。彼らが望むのは、せいぜい、粗末な紙の衾、麻の衣、一鉢の食いもの、あかざの吸い物程度で、こんな物をやったところでどれだけ世の費えになろうや。求めるのは軽少なものばかり、容易に手に入って、得られれば彼らはそれで満足するのだ。だから、世俗に似たことをしているからといって、出家の意義そのものを否定するのは間違っている。頭を丸め黒染の衣を切る身であれば、何といっても、その姿にみずから恥じて、悪事からは遠ざかり、善には近づくことが多いのだ。

そういうことだ。ゆえに、人間として生まれてきたからには、生まれたしるしのためにも、なんとしてでも世を捨てて仏道に入るのが、望ましいことなのである。一生涯ただ欲望を満たすことばかりに熱中して、心の救済をはからないような者は、けものや虫けらと一向に変わらないではないか。

(58)

出家遁世というような人生の一大事を行おうと思い立った人は、たとえどんなに棄てがたく心にかかることがあっても、なしとげるまで待とうとせず、中途半端なままでもただちにそっくり棄てなければならない。「もうちょっとだからこのことをやりおえてから」とか、「同じことならあのことも片付けてから」とか、「これこれのことをやりかけのままにしておいては人の嘲りを受けよう、将来後くされのないよう片付けておいて」とか、「これまで何年もこうしてやってこられたのだ。あのことを待ったとて、そう長くかかるまい。あわててとり乱さぬようにしよう」などと思ったら、どうにも避けられることばかりますます重なって、しなければならぬことが次から次へ起こって、際限もなく、とうてい大事を決行する日が来るわけもない。大体世間の人間を見るに、少し物のわかったくらいの人は、みな、そんなふうに先のことを考えているうちに一生を了えてしまうようだ。

近くに火事が起こって逃げる人が、「ちょっと待って」などと言おうか。わが身を助けようと必死になるなら、恥もかまわず、財産も捨てて逃げ去るものだ。(待てと言ったところで)命が人を待ってくれようか。しかも死の来ることは、水や火が攻めるよりも早く、逃れがたいものである。そのときになって、年とった親、幼い子、君の恩、人の情などを、捨てがたいからといってすてないわけにはいかないではないか。

(59)

いい風情に雪の降った朝、頼みごとがあってある人のもとに手紙を送ったが、中に雪について何も記さなかったところ、返事に、「この雪をどう見ているところかと、一言書き添えるくらいの風情心もない方の頼みごとなど、誰が聴いてさし上げるものですか。返す返す情けないお方ですこと」と言ってきたのこそ、まことにおもしろかった。

もう亡くなった人だけに、こういった小さなことまでが忘れがたい。

(31)

「久しく訪れないでいるので、どんなに恨んでいるだろうと、無沙汰にしてきた自分の怠慢が気になり、言いやる言葉もないでいるころ、女の方から『手空きの仕丁はおりませぬか、一人でいいのですが』などと言ってきたときは、めったにないことに出会った気がして、まことにうれしい。そんな気立ての人がいいなあ」とある人が言ったが、本当にそのとおりである。

(36)

延政門院がまだごく幼くあらせられたころ、後嵯峨上皇の御所へ参上する人に院へのおことづけとして歌を作られた。それは、

ふたつ文字(こ)、牛の角文字(い)、直ぐな文字(し)、歪み文字(く)とぞ君は覚ゆる

というものであった。父君を恋しく思い参らせるということを謎歌で告げられたのだ。

(62)

朝夕へだてなく馴れ親しんでいる人が、何かの折にふと、こちらに距離をおいて、ふだんと変わった、とりすました態度を見せると、「いまさら、なにもそうかしこまることもあるまいに」などと言う人もあるが、わたしはそうは思わない。そういうのこそまことに好ましい人であるよと思われる。

ふだんそう親しくしていない人が、何かの折にうちとけたことなど言うのも、これまた、いかにも好ましく思われる。

(37)

どこへでもいいが、しばらく旅に出てよそに滞在するのこそ、いかにも新鮮な感じがするものだ。

その辺をここあそこと見て歩けば、田舎ふうな所や山里には、見慣れぬ珍しいことがたくさんある。伝手を求めて都のわが家へ手紙をやるにも、「そのこともあのこともみなそのついでついでに忘れないでやっておいておくれ、忘れてはいけないよ」などと言いやるのも面白い。

そういう所では何事につけても気働きさせられるようになる。持っていった道具なども、よいものは家で見るよりよく見えるし、芸のある人、姿形のいい人も、都で見るより味わい深く見える。

寺や社に、人知れず幾日かお籠りするのも、同じように面白い。

(15)

山寺にこもって、人にも会わず、ひたすら仏にお仕えするのがいい。そういうときこそ、退屈することもなく、心の濁りも清まる気持ちがする。

(17)

「ここに牛を売ろうという者がいる。買おうという者が現れ、『明日代金を払って牛を受け取る』、と約束した。ところがその夜のうちに牛が死んだ。買う約束をした者は、代金を払ったあとで牛が死んだのではないから、損をしたな」と話す者がいた。

するとこれを聞いて、そばにた者が言った、「牛の持主はたしかに損をしたにちがいない。だが、一面では大きな利益を得たとも言えるのではないか。というのはだ、大体いのちあるものはみな自分の市の近いことをしらない。牛だってそうだ。きゃつはまさかその夜に自分が死ぬとは知らなかったろう。人間だって同じことだ。今回は思いがけず牛が死んで、人間は死ななかったが、それはたまたまそうだっただけのことだ。牛の方が死なないで、人間の方が死んでいることだってあり得た。それを思えばその人は自分が死ななかったことをよほどありがたいと思わねばならぬ。一日のいのちは万金よりも重いという。それにくらべたら牛の値など鵞毛より軽いではないか。彼は万金を得て、一銭を失っただけだ。その人間が損をしたなどと、どうして言えるか」。

それを聞くと、その場にいた者がみな嘲って言った、「そんな理屈あなにも牛の持主にかぎらんだろうが。無事に生きている者はたくさんいる。その連中がみな万金を得たとでもいうのか」。

すると先の者がさらに話をつづけて言った、「だからだ、人がもし本当に死を憎むのなら、生きてある今を愛せよ、というのだ。いのちあって今を生きているこの喜び、これをこそ毎日楽しまないでどうする。ところが愚かな者は、この最高の喜びを忘れて、骨折ってわざわざそれ以外の楽しみを求める。生きてあるというこの自分にそなわった財を忘れて、危険をおかしてわざわざ自分の外にある財を求めるが、そんなことをして欲望の満足する時のあるはずがあろうか。生きているあいだ生を楽しまないで、もう死ぬという時になって死を恐れる。こんなバカらしい話があろうか。人がみな生を楽しまないのは、死を恐れないからだ。いや、死を恐れないのではなく、死が近いことを忘れ、自分はそうすぐには死なぬと思っているからだ。しかしまた世の中にはひょっとして、自分は生死というような境界は超越しているという者もあるかもしれない。その人は本当の悟りを得ている人と言うべきだ」と。

そこで人々はますますこの屁理屈屋を嘲った。

(93)

明日彼は遠い国へ旅立つそうだと聞いて知っている人に向かって、誰が、心の落ち着いた時でなければできないことを、これをやってくれと頼んだりするだろうか。

とつぜん何か一大事に遭遇した人、大変な悲嘆に襲われた人は、その一大事や悲嘆で心が一杯で、それ以外のことなど何を言っても耳に入るわけがない。そういう人は自分のことで一杯で、他人の身に不幸なことや喜びごとがあっても、訪ねて行きはしない。訪ねて行かなくても、なぜあの人は来ないのだと恨む人もいない。事情を知って、その気持ちを察するからだ。

年とって次第に老いてきたうえに病にもとりつかれた人とか、まして世を捨てた人などは、大事に心をとられているという点で、これらとまったく事情は同じだと言っていい。どんな義理を欠いていても許されるのだ。

人間界の儀式は、どれをとってもしないですまされるようなものはない。世間の習慣、価値観、決まり事を無視できないで、いちいちそれを守ろうとしたら、やらずにすまされることなど何一つない。が、万事そんなふうにしていたら、こうあれかしという願いごとも多くなる。したくないこともせねばならず、身も苦しくなる。心の安らかな折とてもない。そして、そんなふうに生きていたら、一生はつまらぬ小さな事どもにかまけ、防げられているうちに、空しく暮れてしまうのだ。

だが、見よ、はや日は暮れかけたのに道は遠い。わが人生は、がたがたし、すでにケリはつき、これだけのものとわかった。今こそ世間とのもろもろの縁を断ち切るべき時だ。もはや約束をも守るまい。礼儀も考えまい。すべての義理を欠いて、己れの心一つに生きよう。この自分の決意を理解できない人は、あいつは気が狂ったとでも何とでも言うがいい。正気ではないのだ、人情というものがないのだとでも、何とでもししるがいい。非難されようが自分は気にしない。誉められても耳に入れまい。

(112)